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GRAYLING (ARCTIC)

Hunting, shooting, fishing for Grayling (arctic)

Spinning, Coarse fishing, Fly fishing, Fresh water fishing, Game fishing, Ice fishing, Spearfishing


Built for cool, clean waters throughout some northern states in the United States, Canada and western Siberia, arctic grayling are an excellent catch for a Salmonidiae enthusiast.

Like fishing for trout, going out with light spinning or fly fishing tackle for arctic grayling with an assortment of spinners, spoons, jigs, nymphs or dry flies will typically get the job done.

They are active in parts of the river or lake holding invertebrates and worms and look for free moving water that isn't too fast and aggressive.

Look for their small, round mouths surfacing for bugs or a narrow fin rub the surface of the water. When spotting grayling they will look like an oval, gray disk at the bottom of the river or lake. Arctic grayling found in higher altitude lakes are hungry; their diet is restricted to the small invertebrates that can inhabit such mountainous conditions.

This means, as an angler, they are going to smash your lure like it's the best thing it has seen for weeks- so long as it looks believable!

Young, or smaller arctic grayling are prey to species such as monster brown or bull trout, bears and many different birds.

Basic Info


Scientific name: Thymallus arcticus

Size: length up to 76 cm

Weight: up to 3.8 kg

Lifespan: 18 years

Methods: Spinning, Coarse fishing, Fly fishing, Fresh water fishing, Game fishing, Ice fishing, Spearfishing

Continent(s): North America, Siberia, Europe – In streams leading into the Arctic Ocean